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Italics & Underlining

Italics and underlining are like flashers on road signs. They make you take notice. Italics and underlining can be used interchangeably, although usually underlining is used when something is either hand written or typed; if using a computer you can italicize. If you start using italics, don't switch to underlining within the same document.

Italics or underlining are used most often: for titles of longer works: books, magazines, newspapers, films, TV shows, a complete symphony, plays, long poems, albums: Italics or underlining are also used for titles of paintings, sculptures, ships, trains, aircraft, and spacecraft: Tip: Shorter works, such a book chapters, articles, sections of newspapers, short stories, poems, songs, and TV episodes are placed in quotation marks.

Neither italics nor quotation marks are used with titles of major religious texts, books of the Bible, or classic legal documents: Use italics or underlining when using words from another language: Tip: Many foreign words have become absorbed into our language and should not be italized or underlined. When in doubt, consult the dictionary. Also, common Latin abbreviations should not be italicized or underlined: Use italics or underlining to emphasize, stress, or clarify a word or letter in a sentence or when using a word as a linguistic symbol rather than for its meaning: Exercise 5: Italics & Underlining

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